Talcum Powder and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer

A Comprehensive Guide to the Literature for Personal Injury Lawyers

Publisher: Medifocus Legal
Publication Date: June 15, 2016
Number of Pages: 43

Talc-based powders such as Johnson’s Baby Powder and Shower to Shower have recently received increased scrutiny because of evidence that they may increase the risk for developing ovarian cancer when used by women for personal hygiene. Over 1,000 lawsuits have already been filed nationwide and the number is continuing to increase. In 2016, two separate juries in St. Louis, Missouri, awarded multi-million verdicts to plaintiffs in talcum powder cases. In general, plaintiffs in these cases either claim that talcum powder usage caused their ovarian cancer and/or failure of the manufacturer to warn women that talc-based powders may increase their ovarian cancer risk.

Talcum powder is a product made from talc, a mineral composed of magnesium, silicon and oxygen. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies talc as a possible carcinogen to humans based on limited evidence from human studies of a link between the perineal (genital) use of talc-based body powders and ovarian cancer. Medical professionals were alerted to a possible link between talcum powder and ovarian cancer as early as 1971 with the publication of a study entitled “Talc and Carcinoma of the Ovary and Cervix” that appeared in the Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the British Commonwealth. Surprisingly, the next major study did not appear in the literature until 1982 with the publication of an article in the journal Cancer entitled “Ovarian Cancer and Talc: A Case-Control Study”. Since that time, additional studies gradually appeared in well respected medical journals noting a possible link between ovarian cancer and the use of talc-based powder for feminine hygiene.

The Medifocus Literature Guide on Talcum Powder and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer is a comprehensive guide to the medical literature for personal injury attorneys who are currently involved in litigation or are considering taking on talcum powder cases that outlines the scientific evidence accumulated over the past 45 years supporting a possible association between genital use of talcum powder by women and the development of ovarian cancer. The Guide includes 40 journal article references with links to the article abstracts and full-text sources as well as a valuable Author Directory for quickly identifying medical experts for case reviews and expert testimony. Personal injury lawyers can use the Guide to identify critical medical issues, ask the right questions – and get the right answers – as they prepare their talcum powder cases for depositions, settlement, or trial.

Talcum Powder and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer is a one-of-a-kind literature reference Guide that includes:

  • A comprehensive bibliography of 40 journal article references indexed in MEDLINE published in well respected medical and scientific journals.
  • Online access to the abstracts (summaries) of the articles.
  • Online access to the free full-text version of 15 articles.
  • Links to full-text sources of other articles that are available for purchase directly from individual journal publishers.
  • A unique “Author Directory” consisting of the names and institutional affiliations of experts who have published and have specialized knowledge about Talcum Powder and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer. The “Author Directory” is a valuable resource for quickly identifying and locating experts for case reviews, opinions, and testimony.

The MediFocus Literature Guide on Talcum Powder and the Risk of Ovarian Cancer
is available in two formats:
 

PDF Format
(available for immediate download to your computer)
Cost: $ 134.95

Soft-Cover Book
(includes free PDF download plus free shipping in United States)
Cost: $ 164.95

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